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Table. Blood type A and B frequency in cats in certain countries and breeds*
Domestic shorth. cats
Type A
99.7 99.6 98.5 97.5 95.3 97.0 73.7 88.0
97
97
100
85
94
100
89
96
97
100
75
Type B
0.3 0.4 1.5 2.5 4.7 3.0 26.3 12.0
3
3
0
14
6
0
11
4
3
0
25
Type A
              84
              100
              82
              64
              100
              67
              59
              73
              94
              84
              97
              93
              100
              86
              81
              100
              82
              83
              100
              50
The major crossmatch tests for alloantibodies in the recipient’s plasma against donor cells, whereas the minor crossmatch test looks for alloantibodies in the donor’s plasma against the recipient’s red blood cells. Mixing
a drop of donor/recipient blood with donor/recipient
plasma will detect A-B incompatibilities if typing is not available. However, proper techniques for crossmatching and experience are required to detect other less severe incompatibilities. A major crossmatch incompatibility is of greatest importance because it predicts that the transfused donor cells will be attacked by the patient’s plasma, thereby causing a potentially life-threatening acute hemolytic transfusion reaction. As fatal reactions may occur with <1ml of incompatible blood, compatibility testing by administering a small amount of blood is not appropriate. This has been shown in experimental studies to result in fatal reactions. The major and minor crossmatch can show incompatibility prior to any transfusion due to the presence of naturally occurring alloantibodies in cats, not only for the AB but also the Mik and possibly other blood group systems.
USA
Argentina Australia
India (Bombay) Europe
Austria England Finland France Germany Hungary
Ital Netherlands Scotland Switzerland Turkey
Type B
16
0
18
36
0
33
41
27
76
16
3
7
0
14
19
0
18
17
0
50
Northeast North Central Southeast Southwest West Coast
There are no universal donor cats. Donor and patient need to be typed, even if it is “only” a domestic shorthair cat. Simple AB blood typing cards (DMS Laboratories, 2 Darts Mill Road, Flemington, NJ) and chromatographic strip cartridges (Alvedia DME, Lyon, France and recently DMS) are available for in practice use.
Blood crossmatching tests: Blood incompatibilities have been recognized related to the AB blood group system and following blood transfusion through crossmatching cats or as a result of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions. Standard laboratory tube and gel column crossmatching techniques, but also in-clinic gel tube (DMS) and strip kits are now available. Screening feline blood donors and patients for the presence of naturally occurring alloantibodies (AB and Mik systems) prove necessary in clinical practice. The presence of autoagglutination or severe hemolysis may preclude the crossmatch testing.
Percentage (%)
Percentage (%) Purebred cats Abyssinian
Am. shorthair Birman
British shorthair Burmese
Cornish rex Devon rex
Exotic shorthair Himalayan Japanese Bobtail Maine Coon Norwegian Forest Oriental shorthair Persian
*Ignoring the rare AB cats
Scottish Fold
Siamese
Somali
Sphinx
Tonkinese
Turkish Angora/Van
in many breeds with type B cats
An Urban Experience
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