Page 344 - ONLINE PROCEEDING BOOK WSAVA 2017
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344
An Urban Experience
BASIC TENANTS OF BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION
- Describe target in clear observable terms
- Describe antecedent events and conditions occurring immediately before behavior
- Describe events immediately following behavior
- Examine antecedents, behavior and consequences
- Devise new antecedent and/or consequences to teach new behaviors or change existing ones.
- Evaluate and maintain.
CLIENT CONSIDERATIONS
- Habitual behavior will continue with the bird - Behaviors may serve a purpose
- Behavior modi cation is a process
- Do not expect the bird alone to change
- Behavior modi cation involves consistency and work
- Do not reward negative behavior
- Parrots will and can change behavior over their lifetime.
FEATHER LOSS
Most Self-induced feather loss in companion birds
is one of the most common and frustrating avian
case presentations. There are a number of causes
for feather loss and these cases require a thorough investigative work-up by the attending veterinarian. Differential diagnoses for feather picking birds include hypersensitivity, environmental and nutritional causes and psychological.
Initial treatment is based on history, clinical presentation and diagnostic test results. If a disease process is identi ed as
a primary cause of the feather loss, then it is appropriately treated. If it is determined that the self-induced feather loss is psychological the other medications are prescribed. We start with the anti-depressant and hope that treatment is effective. If we decide that the bird should be treated with the anti-psychotic medication, we have a conference with the owner explaining the serious side effects that may be noted with its use. We never place a patient on a concurrent anti-depressant and anti-psychotic treatment regime.
PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICATIONS
1) Nortriptyline HCL (Aventyl HCL, Lilly) syrup 2 mg/ml Dose: 1 ml/4oz drinking water
2) Amitriptyline (Elavil, Stuart) Dose: 1-2 mg/kg PO q 12-24h
3) Paroxetine (Paxil, SmithKline Beecham) Dose: 1 – 2 mg/kg q24h
4) Haloperidol (Haldol, Henry Schein) solution 2mg/ml
Dose: 0.2 mg/kg BID for birds < 1 kg 0.15 mg/kg SID-BID for birds > 1kg
NEVER ADMINISTER TO HYACINTH MACAWS – TOXIC
If we feel the case may be the result of an environmental hypersensitivity, there is another treatment protocol that we commonly use. This treatment is listed below and is given concurrently to the patient.
1) Hydroxyzine HCL (Barre-National) 10 mg/5 ml Dose: 0.1 ml/100grams body weight SID
2) Liquid Fatty Acid (P zer)
Dose: 0.1 ml/100 grams body weight SID
BEHAVIORAL
Self-induced feather loss may be initiated by a medical disease problem and resolve when that primary cause is removed or treated. Unfortunately, many times even after the initiating cause of feather picking has been removed the bird still will pull out feathers. It is the behavioral
habit of pulling the feathers out that is the most dif cult condition to stop once a diagnosis has been made.
As with any behavior modi cation, self-induced feather picking/trauma is very dif cult to treat and the owner must continue to stay the course. Diet, surrounding environment, cage position, other birds surrounding the cage and new family members are reasons for initiation or aggravating feather picking problems. There are components that can be manipulated by the owner
for possible reduction or resolution of the condition. New therapeutic regimes and behavior modi cation techniques are being described or advanced as treatments for this multi-factorial disease presentation. If the cause of the feather picking problems is determined to be behavioral, many avian behaviorists believe that self-induced feather loss is misplaced behavior and a response to stress.1
TREATMENTS2
ELIZABETHAN COLLAR
A rapid effective treatment is the Elizabethan (E) collar. The use of an E collar is not recommended unless the bird is traumatizing the skin or there are epithelial injuries. The E-collar is a temporary treatment, that when re- moved, often does not result in modi cation of the
REFERENCES
1. Friedman SG, Edling TM, Cheney CD, Wilson L, Linden PG, Lightfoot TL: Concepts in behavior, in Harrison GJ, Lightfoot TL (eds): Clinical Avian Medicine (vol 1). Palm Beach, FL, Spix Publishing Inc. pp 45-84, 2006
2. Carpenter, James W (ed):Exotic Animal Formulary, 4th Ed. St. Louis, MO, Elsevier/Saunders, 2013
42ND WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND FECAVA 23RD EUROCONGRESS


































































































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