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An Urban Experience
replaced after a total of 6 doses.When a dog no longer responds front-line chemotherapy, rescue protocols
are recommended. There is decreased likelihood of response (30-50%) and shorter remission durations, typically half the length of the initial remission. Still some patients experience long-term re-inductions. Some commonly used protocols include MOPP, doxorubicin or mitoxantrone with DTIC, Lomustine/l-aspariginase/ prednisone, and single agent Lomustine.
Overall: Lymphoma is one of the most successfully treated cancers in dogs, and many patients with lymphoma outlive animals with other noncancerous diseases such as kidney, heart, and liver disease. Dogs treated with chemotherapy live significantly longer than untreated dogs, and chemotherapy is generally well- tolerated in most dogs.
Additional Resources
1. Vail DM, et al. Hematopoietic Tumors, Canine Lymphoma and Lymphoid Leukemia. In: Small Animal Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. St. Louis Missouri: Elsevier Saunders; 2013: 608-638.
2. Williams LE. Lymphoma, Dog (Multicentric) in Clinical Veterinary Advisor Dogs and Cats. 2nd edition. St. Louis Missouri: Elsevier Mosby; 2011: 675-678
3. Bryan JN. Lymphoma. In Cancer Management in Small Animal Practice. Saunders 2010. 343-350
4. Alexandrakis I, et al, Vet Comp Oncol. 2014.
5. Vaughan MA, et al, JVIM 2007; 1(6):1332-9
 42ND WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND FECAVA 23RD EUROCONGRESS
  






















































































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