Page 490 - ONLINE PROCEEDING BOOK WSAVA 2017
P. 490

An Urban Experience
WSVA7-0408
DSAVA: HEALTHY BREEDING
WHO DECIDES ON DOG BREEDING. THE INCREASING POWER OF NONORGANIZED BREEDERS AND CONSUMERS
H. Friis Proschowsky1
1Danish Kennel Club, Department of Health, Solroed Strand, Denmark
WHO DECIDES ON DOG BREEDING? THE INCREASING POWER OF NONORGANIZED BREEDERS AND CONSUMERS
Helle Friis Proschowsky, DVM, Ph.D. Veterinary Consultant The Danish Kennel Club, Parkvej 1, 2680 Solroed Strand hfpr@dkk.dk
Introduction
The selective breeding of dogs with extreme physical features (short nose,  at skull, small body size, protruding eyes and the like) has, together with a high level of inbreeding, led to a number of health and welfare problems for many purebred dogs. 1, 2, 3 Looking at
the discussions in both scholarly journals and popular media one may get the impression that organized dog breeding and dog shows are the main factors for these problems. Even though this may have been true in the past, it can be argued that the power of selection has changed dramatically over the past few decades. At least in Denmark, there has been a movement away from the organized breeders within the national kennel clubs. This shift has a great impact on the possibility to increase the welfare of dogs by means of breeding programs.
The Danish dog population
There are approximately half a million dogs in Denmark distributed in 20 -22% of all Danish households.
4,5 Since 1993, chip marking and registration of all
dogs – purebreds as well as mixed breeds - has been statutory. 6 Information about chip number owner and breed is stored in the Danish Dog Registry and this makes it possible to follow  uctuations in the Danish dog population. The dogs in the Danish Dog Registry falls into two major groups; purebred and mixed breed dogs. The mixed breed dogs constituted 18% of the total registrations of new dogs entering the registry in 2016. The purebred dogs can be further divided into 1: The purebred dogs with a pedigree in the Danish Kennel Club (DKC, 33% in 2016), and 2: Dogs that enter the Dog Registry with a breed name, but where the breed
is only con rmed by the owner and the veterinarian performing the chip marking (49%). Some of these dogs are purebred while others can have some kind of mixed background. While the mixed breeds have stayed at a
relatively constant level, the balance between purebred dogs registered in the DKC and “purebred” dogs without a pedigree has shifted towards the latter (Figure 1).
Figure 1. New entries in the Danish dog registry per year in total (light grey bars) and the amount which is also registered in the Danish Kennel Club (dark grey bars).
The observed decrease in the total number of dogs from the mid-nineties to the millennium was followed by a similar decrease in the DKC  gures. During the following economic upswing, we see a dramatic increase in the total number of new puppies entering the dog registry each year. However, this time the DKC  gures stay at the same level and do not follow the general development. Several issues may have caused this trend. One hypothesis is that the characteristics of the puppy buyers entering the dog marked during the upswing shifted. The new consumers had little or no former experience with dogs and no intentions of participating in activities where a pedigree would be a prerequisite. To some extend
the new consumers tended to see dogs as a fashion- in uenced accessory. 7 In addition, Danish legislation may have counteracted the organized breeder’s possibilities to meet the sudden increase in demand.
Disadvantages of being a registered breeder
Traditionally, the Danish dog market has been characterized by the absence of large commercial breeding operations (a.k.a. puppy farms) found in other countries. The majority of the puppies purchased each year - at least from organized breeders - comes from smaller breeders with 2-4 breeding dogs. This is partly due to tradition and partly to legislation. If a Danish breeder produces more than two litters per year, s/
he will be subject to the Commercial Dog Breeding Act, meaning that s/he must ful l speci c requirements regarding registration, inspection, education, etc. 8 This legislation may have urged the registered breeders to stay below the limit of two litters while unregistered breeders could increase their “production” as long as they managed to stay out of the public eye. Some may
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42ND WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND FECAVA 23RD EUROCONGRESS


































































































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