Page 699 - WSAVA2017
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WSVA7-0160 ANESTHESIA
COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF MEDETOMIDINE AND DEXMEDETOMIDINE ON INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE IN CATS
Z. Pekcan1, O. Cinar2
1Kirikkale University School of Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Kirikkale, Turkey
2Petcode Animal Hospital, Surgery Department, Ankara, Turkey
Introduction
Alpha2-agonists such as medetomidine and dexmedetomidine are the most preferred sedative drugs in cats. Both drugs can induce vomiting and alter intraocular pressures (IOP) during vomiting and sedation period.
Objectives
The aim of this study is to compare the effects of medetomidine and dexmedetomidine on the results of tonometry and their reverses with atipamezol in cats.
Methods
WSVA7-0101 ANIMAL WELFARE
PRELIMINARY REPORT OF ASSESSMENT OF STRESS AND RELAXATION RELATED BEHAVIORS OF KENNEL-HOUSED CATS (FELIS CATUS) IN A NO-KILL RESCUE SHELTER
J. Berger1, F. Ho2
1SF SPCA, Rescue and Welfare, San Francisico, USA 2SF SPCA, Rescue and Welfare, San Francisco, USA
Introduction
The study of animal welfare has been largely targeted
to farm, laboratory, and zoo animals. Only in the last decade research was conducted on companion
animals in shelter settings. The Five Freedoms model, widely accepted to define welfare standards, is violated by exposing animals to stressors associated with confinement. Not only do such stressors decrease welfare, but create undesirable in-kennel behaviors which are directly related to length of stay in a shelter.
Objectives
This study aimed to assess stress and relaxation related behaviors in shelter cats.
Methods
The San Francisco Society of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SF SPCA), California USA was the study
site. Sixteen (n=16) cats were observed in 3 different locations. The subjects were representative of cats admitted to SF SPCA based on breed, age, and size. Each cat was observed for 1 minute every 10 minutes for 6 hours by a trained observer.
Results
Stress behaviors were exhibited by all subjects and varied based on location in the shelter. Cats exhibited stress signals 9.14% of observation time in location one, 6.49% in location two, and 2.65% in the third location. Stress exhibited varied greatly by age; older cats (>12 years) exhibited stress related behaviors in 45% of time observed.
Conclusions
Overall, the results suggest that kennel-housed cats
in this no-kill rescue shelter exhibited stress-related behaviors three times more likely based on their location. Senior cats were the most stressed subset of cats in this rescue shelter setting.
Twenty cats were randomly divided into two groups
of ten. The first group was sedated with 40 mg/kg dexmedetomidine (DEX) and the second group was received 80 mg/kg medetomidine (MED), intramuscularly. The vomiting cats were included. IOP were measured before administration (T0), just after vomiting, 20 minutes intervals during 1 hour period (T20, T40, T60) and 20 minutes after atipamezol treatment (TAA).
Results
The baseline IOP in mmHg in MED and DEX were 21±4 and 19.5±3, respectively. While IOPs were increased
in DEX (21.5±4), they were decreased in MED (19.5±6) after vomiting. IOPs continued to decrease significantly at T20, T40 and T60 in both groups. They were 16±1, 15±2 and 16±3 in MED and 16±2, 15±2, 16±2 in DEX, respectively. IOPs were increased to the baseline level
at TAA. The difference within time points were statistically significant in both groups, while there were no significant differences in the IOPs between groups in any time points.
Conclusions
A significant change was recorded in IOP in ocular healthy cats and these alterations can be reversed with atipamezol. The IOP effect must be taken into consideration when planning premedication with medetomidine or dexmedetomidine in cats.
An Urban Experience
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