Page 700 - ONLINE PROCEEDING BOOK WSAVA 2017
P. 700

An Urban Experience
WSVA7-0102 ANIMAL WELFARE
PRELIMINARY REPORT OF ASSESSMENT OF STRESS AND RELAXATION RELATED BEHAVIORS OF KENNEL-HOUSED DOGS (CANIS FAMILIARIS) IN A NO-KILL RESCUE SHELTER
J. Berger1, F. Ho2
1SF SPCA, Rescue and Welfare, San Francisico, USA 2SF SPCA, Rescue and Welfare, San Francsisco, USA
Introduction
The study of animal welfare has been largely targeted
to farm, laboratory, and zoo animals. Only in the last decade research was conducted on companion
animals in shelter settings. The Five Freedoms model, widely accepted to de ne welfare standards, is violated by exposing animals to stressors associated with con nement. Not only do such stressors decrease welfare, but create undesirable in-kennel behaviors which are directly related to length of stay in the shelter.
Objectives
This study aimed to assess stress and relaxation related behaviors in shelter dogs.
Methods
The San Francisco Society of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SF SPCA), California USA was the study site. Twenty-two dogs (n=22) were observed in their housing at two different locations. The subjects were representative of dogs admitted to SF SPCA based
on breed (mix), age, and size. Each dog was observed for 1 minute every 10 minutes for 6 hours by a trained observer.
Results
Dogs were stressed on average of 56.82% overall. Based on location the dogs exhibited stress signals in 70.00% of the observations in location one and 28.57% in location two. Stress behaviors exhibited varied greatly by age; showing dogs with an average age of 4 years exhibited the most stress related behaviors.
Conclusions
Overall, the results suggest that kennel-housed dogs
in this no-kill rescue shelter exhibited stress more than half the time during the observations. Based on age and location stress signals varied signi cantly. Dogs, 4 years of age, were the most stressed subset of dogs in this rescue shelter setting.
WSVA7-0030 ANIMAL WELFARE
EXOPET: A STUDY ON THE KEEPING OF EXOTIC AND WILD BIRDS AND REPTILES UNDER ANIMAL WELFARE ASPECTS
M. Krautwald-junghanns1
1Clinic for Birds and Reptiles, Veterinary Faculty, Leipzig, Germany
Introduction
Currently, there are manifold attempts aiming at monitoring and regulation of the private keeping of exotic pets within the EU.
Objectives
To gain scienti c based data on the trade and the keeping of exotic birds and reptiles as well as related animal welfare problems
Methods
An extensive study was  nanced by the German Federal Ministry of Agriculture, where numerous questionnaires were distributed customized for specialized veterinarians, state veterinarians, animal owners/ breeders (www. exopet-studie.de). An analysis on trade ways and the  nal destination of pets was performed on several
levels. More than one hundred veterinary and customs authorities were interviewed. Numerous fairs were evaluated using a profound checklist
Results
Evaluation of the specialized veterinarians addressed numerous health problems potentially attributed to the keeping and faulty management of exotic birds and reptiles. Apart from the overall keeping conditions, one important aspect lay in the suitability of pet accessories presented by the zoo market. One of the outcomes was also an unsatisfactory surveillance by the authorities. Concerning animal shelters,  rst results show that on the one hand a broad range of species is received, on the other hand it became clear that especially the so-called “beginner-species”, relatively inexpensive species or species with high life expectancies are regularly handed in by private owners or con scated by authorities.
Conclusions
Important factors discussed in this context are the
low costs of most exotic birds and reptiles and the often insuf cient or lacking owner expertise. Speci c suggestions to solve the problems seen in the study will be discussed.
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42ND WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND FECAVA 23RD EUROCONGRESS


































































































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