Page 701 - ONLINE PROCEEDING BOOK WSAVA 2017
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WSVA7-0245 ANIMAL WELFARE
OVERWORK AND “LETTING GO” THERAPY
M. Marion1
1Clinic montolivet, 13, Marseille, France
Introduction
The appearance of signs of anxiety in dogs engaged in learning work can be a sign of overwork. This case series explores the ef cacy of a new therapeutic method based on “letting go”.
WSVA7-0165 BEHAVIOR
OROMUCOSAL DEXMDETOMIDINE GEL FOR ALLEVIATION OF ACUTE FEAR AND ANXIETY IN DOGS DURING MINOR VETERINARY AND HUSBANDRY PROCEDURES
M. Korpivaara1, M. Huhtinen2, J. Aspegren3, K. Overall4 1Orion Corporation- Orion Pharma, Research & Development, Turku, Finland
2Orion Corporation- Orion Pharma, Research& Development, Turku, Finland
3Orion Corporation- Orion Pharma, Research& Development, Turku, Finland
4University of Pennsylvania, Biology Department, Philadelphia, USA
Introduction
Distress associated with veterinary visits is very common in dogs.
Objectives
The primary objective was to evaluate the ef cacy of dexmedetomidine gel in improving the ability to perform
a physical examination and a short minor veterinary or husbandry procedure in dogs suffering from fear of these procedures. Two dexmedetomidine gel doses (125 μg/m2 and 250 μg/m2) were compared for ef cacy and safety.
Methods
The study was a randomised, double-blind, placebo- controlled, parallel-group, multicenter, pilot dose- determination study with 74 client-owned dogs. Eligibility of dogs was con rmed at a baseline visit. Investigators assessed the ability to perform the intended procedure using a scale from 1 (procedure could be easily performed) to 5 (not possible). The distributions of the 5 scores were compared between dexmedetomidine and placebo treatments using a generalised linear model for ordinal data
Results
The treatment effect was statistically signi cant (p=0.0136), the ability to perform the procedure was better with both 125 μg/m2 (OR 4.9; 90% CI 1.9-13.1; p=0.0072) and 250 μg/m2 (OR 3.5; 90% CI 1.4-8.9; p=0.0278) doses of dexmedetomidine compared with placebo. No sedation was noted. A decrease of 29-30 bpm in heart rate from the originally high values was seen in dexmedetomidine-treated dogs, but not for those on placebo, supporting the physiological anxiety lowering effect of the study treatment.
Objectives
Some authors have described a breakdown in performance at work in explosive detection dogs (1). This phenomenon has also been described in avalanche rescue dogs (2). Overwork is not only a problem for working dogs, as it is also seen in companion dogs (3,4,5). The signs of anxiety vary, and can include: withdrawal, inhibition, obsessive repetitive behavior and psychosomatic disease.
Methods
Owner awareness of the problem is not necessarily the only option. The owners of these dogs are often very involved in their dogs’ therapy or education, and it may be more ef cient to suggest exercises to relax the dog and reinforce the link.
An original method consists of sprinkling very small pieces of food over a grassy area. The dog is then allowed to sniff out and search for the food without the owner’s intervention, and the dog is self-rewarded by the discovery.
Results
The objective is to provide the dog with a stand-alone “mental” physical exercise and to allow it to become fatigued and then relax without being “ordered” to.
Conclusions
In a society where performance and individual success are highly valued, some owners may demonstrate a mirror effect and a signi cant desire to exhibit a perfect animal, but this should not affect animal welfare.
An Urban Experience
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