Page 736 - WSAVA2017
P. 736

An Urban Experience
WSVA7-0238 EXOTICS
LEAD II ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENTS RECORDED CHINCHILLA LANIGERA
M. Garncarz1, M. Parzeniecka-Jaworska1, K. Warchulska1, D. Dierżanowska-Góryń2
1Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Department of Pathology and Veterinary Diagnostics, Warsaw, Poland 2Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Department of Animal Breeding and Production, Warsaw, Poland
Introduction
Chinchillas are becoming a popular pet in households. Few studies have been performed in the Chinchilla lanigera, specifically regarding the cardiovascular system. This is a difficult animal to study in the clinical setting.
Objectives
The aim of this study was to ascertain if electrocardiographic (ECG) recording in Chinchilla lanigera can be performed without chemical restraint and if lead II measurements of these recordings could be assessed.
Methods
A six-lead ECG was recorded in 45 chinchillas held in
a vertical position without the use of chemical restraint. An average of 3 values from lead II. Descriptive statistics were performed with Microsoft Excel.
Results
ECG were successfully recorded in 45 chinchillas.
QRS morphologies included qRs(n=12), qR(n=39), QS(n=15), Qr(n=1), R(21), RS(n=11), Rs(n=2), rS(n=34). P-wave amplitude (0.0,035+0.019mV) and duration (0.025+0.008s), PR-interval (0.060+0.020s), R-wave amplitude (0.126+0.098mV), QRS complex duration (0,044+0,005s), QT-interval (0.100+0.000s), ST- segment elevation (0.025+0.039 mV), T-wave amplitude (0,080+0.061 mV), mean electrical axis (69.474+62.256˚) and heart rate (205+18) measurements were performed. Leads I and aVR had higher amplitudes than lead II. No abnormal rhythms were recorded.
Conclusions
ECG recording can be successfully performed in chinchillas without chemical restraint with the animals in a vertical position, limbs directed to the examiner. Lead
II measurements are feasible and values that may be used as guidelines are given, however lead I and aVR are clearer to read and more studies are warranted to obtain reference ranges.
WSVA7-0262 FELINE MEDICINE
SPOROTRICHOSIS IN DOMESTIC FELINES IN GUARULHOS, BRAZIL
F.F. Gonsales1, J.M. Guerra2, A. Moreto1, J.P. Takahashi2, N.C.C.D.A. Fernandes2, N.R. Benites1
1FMVZ USP, VPS, São Paulo, Brazil
2Adolf Lutz Institute, Pathology Center, São Paulo, Brazil
Introduction
Sporotrichosis assumed epidemic proportions in Brazil in the last years and is currently considered a serious public health problem. This subcutaneous mycosis, more often founded in urban areas, is characterized by the presence of nodular papulopustular lesions or gummy ulcer. In the domestic cat, the clinical signs are quite diverse and, if occurring the systemic involvement, sporotrichosis could evolve causing the death of cat.
Objectives
Identify the occurrence of sporotrichosis in cats with suggestive lesions.Identify if healthy cats - living with sick cats - are asymptomatic carriers of the fungus. Relate the mycological and histopathological identification of Sporothrix schenckii complex. Determine the species of Sporothrix using PCR.
Methods
Mycological culture, histopathological, PCR.
Results
A total of 49 cats were analyzed in this study. Among them, 84% (41 cats) had clinical lesions and 16%
(8 cats) were asymptomatic. Of all 41 injured cats,
39% (16 cats) had positive mycological culture and
three positive samples were confirmed by PCR as Sporothrix braziliensis. These animals also presented pyogranulomatous dermatitis, multifocal to coalescing, severe with numerous intrahistiocytic 2 to 6 μm diameter, elongated or dot-like, cigar-shaped to oval yeasts. All samples (oral mucosa) of asymptomatic contactants were negative in mycological culture.
Conclusions
There is an outbreak of sporothricosis occurring in Guarulhos city – SP, Brazil, with high number of cases in cats and humans. Therefore, the importance of this study is to confirm that animals with suggestive lesions are truly infected with the fungus and healthy animals, despite living together with infected cats, did not carry the agent.
    736
 42ND WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND FECAVA 23RD EUROCONGRESS
  




























































   734   735   736   737   738