Page 748 - WSAVA2017
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An Urban Experience
WSVA7-0082
INFECTIOUS AND EMERGING DISEASES
EFFICACY OF RIVAROXABAN IN DOGS WITH HEARTWORM DISEASE
G. Piccinini1
1Veterinary Clinic, DVM Gino Piccinini, Ostiglia, Italy
Introduction
The agent of heartworm disease is Dirofilaria immittis. Bloodsucking mosquitoes (dipteral: culicidae) are always vectors of Dirofilaria, especially in the Po River Valley,
an endemic area, in which the environmental conditions of temperature and humidity promote the growth of mosquitoes.
Objectives
Effectiveness evaluation of Rivaroxaban in association with chlorhydrate melarsomine and doxycycline hydrochloride to prevent thromboembolism in 12 dogs. The prevention of thromboembolic complications
have been monitoring for five weeks by measuring of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombine time (PT).
Methods
Subjects: 12 aduls, mixed breed, 7 male and 5 female dogs
Time period: from January 2015 to November 2016 Tester: Snap Idexx® HW, CHW Ag Isomedic®
Test results: 7 dogs with microfilaria circulating in the bloodstream and 5 dogs without microfilaria but positive to Snap Idexx® HW, CHW Ag Isomedic®
Materials: Rivaroxaban (0,35 mg/kg/die/os) for 5 weeks, with single dose of chlorhydrate melarsomina (2,5 mg/ kg/IM) and doxycycline hydrochloride (10 mg/kg/BID).
Results
Rivaroxaban use in dogs prevents pulmonary embolism and other severe coagulopathies. PT and aPTT monitored for 5 weeks have been inside the limits range.
Conclusions
The prevention of coagulation disorders and easy administration are the goals of the therapy with Rivaroxaban, even if the efficacy must be showed in larger sample, especially for side effects. Of course the treatment with Rivaroxaban can be a good alternative tool to the usual treatment to prevent thromboembolism.
WSVA7-0129
INFECTIOUS AND EMERGING DISEASES
VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES IN DOGS IN BALTIC AND NORDIC COUNTRIES: A QUESTIONNAIRE STUDY
V. Tiškina1, P. Jokelainen2
1Estonian University of Life Sciences, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Tartu, Estonia 2University of Helsinki, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Helsinki, Finland
Introduction
Canine vector-borne parasitic diseases are spreading north in Europe.
Objectives
We surveyed how large a proportion of veterinarians in Baltic and Nordic countries saw cases of canine babesiosis and infections with Dirofilaria immitis and Dirofilaria repens in dogs in 2016.
Methods
An online questionnaire was open 01.01.–31.01.2017. Data were analyzed using OpenEpi and Stata.
Results
Altogether 123 veterinarians completed the questionnaire. More than half of veterinarians from Baltic countries and 10% from Nordic countries had seen canine babesiosis. Over 20% of the cases in Baltic countries and almost 80% in Nordic countries reportedly had a history of travel or import. Almost 25% of veterinarians in Baltic countries and over 10% in Nordic countries had seen a dog with D. immitis. A single
case in Baltic countries but 80% of the cases in Nordic countries reportedly had a history of travel or import. Almost 25% of veterinarians in Baltic countries but few in Nordic countries had seen a dog with D. repens. None of the cases in Baltic countries reportedly had history of travel or import, while most in Nordic countries did. While 48% of veterinarians knew that canine babesiosis is not a zoonosis, 26% knew that D. immitis is zoonotic and 34% knew that D. repens is zoonotic.
Conclusions
The results indicate that there were local cases of the three vector-borne parasitic infections in Baltic countries, while most cases seen in Nordic countries appeared imported. Substantial proportion of colleagues did not know whether the parasites are zoonotic.
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 42ND WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND FECAVA 23RD EUROCONGRESS
  



























































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