Page 757 - ONLINE PROCEEDING BOOK WSAVA 2017
P. 757

WSVA7-0273 NUTRITION
THE IMPACT OF DIET FAT ON CHOLESTEROL, TRIGLYCERIDE AND 3-OH-BUTYRATE CONCENTRATIONS IN BLOOD SAMPLES OF DOGS
WSVA7-0132 NUTRITION
HEMATOLOGY AND CLINICAL CHEMISTRY IN DOGS EATING DIFFERENT KIND OF DIETS
N. Sjögren1, C. Frisk1, J. Anturaniemi1, A. Hielm-Björkman1
1University of helsinki, Faculty of veterinary medicine- Department of Equine and Small Animal Medicine, Helsinki, Finland
Introduction
The diet has signi cant physiological and metabolic effects on the body, and it might have important role and effect on dog’s blood parameters and health, which is important to consider in veterinary practice.
Objectives
To determine the effects of different diets on the blood biochemistry and hematology pro les in pet dogs.
Methods
A total of 101 client-owned dogs were included in the analyses. Altogether, 28 were fed a 100% raw diet
(mean age 4.3 years), 26 a 100% dry diet (mean age
5.1 years), and 47 a mixed diet (dry and/or raw and/or home-cooked food) (mean age 3.9 years). Hematology was analysed from EDTA whole blood and biochemistry from serum samples. Statistical analyses were performed using the Kruskal Wallis test.
Results
Although most values were within reference limits,
the following signi cant differences were observed:
blood erythrocytes, hemoglobin, and creatinine were higher, and alkaline phosphatase was lower in raw
food fed dogs than in dry and mixed food fed dogs. Thrombocytes, albumin, and protein were higher in raw food fed dogs than in mixed food fed dogs. Phosphate was higher and sodium lower in mixed food fed dogs than in dry and raw food fed dogs. Glucose and urea were higher in mixed food fed dogs than in dry food fed dogs. Cholesterol was higher in dry food fed dogs than in raw and mixed food fed dogs.
Conclusions
This study shows signi cant effect of the diet on blood parameters in dogs, and diet should be taken into account when evaluating blood parameters.
An Urban Experience
A. Hielm-Björkman1
1University of Helsinki, Dept. of Equine and Small Animal Medicine, Helsinki, Finland
Introduction
Research show that a high-fat (HF) diet, compared to a high-carbohydrate (HC) diet, decreases cholesterol and triglycerides in man.
Objectives
To see if dogs on a HF-LC (high fat-low carb) diet change from a glucose metabolism towards a keto-body metabolism, we analysed 3-hydroxybutyrate, cholesterol and triglycerides from serum of dogs on HF-LC and LF- HC (low fat-high carb) diets.
Methods
A total of 44 client-owned dogs were included in the analyses. Of these 26 dogs were fed a 100% raw HF-
LC diet (50/0% in dry matter) and 18 dogs a 100%
kibble LF-HC diet (17/48% in dry matter) for a mean
of 129 days. All dogs were Staffordshire bull terriers. Triglycerides and 3-hydroxybutyrate were analysed from Li-hep plasma and cholesterol from serum. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test.
Results
There was no difference of concentrations of any of the measured values between the diet groups at baseline. At the end of the diet intervention cholesterol (p<0.001) and triglycerides (p=0.011) were signi cantly lower whereas 3-hydroxybutyrate (p=0.021) was signi cantly higher when the dogs had been on a raw HF-LC diet, compared to on the LF-HC diet. Indicating better liver function, also ALAT (p=0.015) and AFOS (p<0.001) were signi cantly lower after the HF-LC diet.
Conclusions
This study shows signi cant effect of the diet on fat metabolism parameters in dogs: eating a high fat diet changes the energy metabolism from producing and using glucose to producing and using ketone bodies. Type of cholesterols should now be analyzed in dogs.
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