Page 780 - ONLINE PROCEEDING BOOK WSAVA 2017
P. 780

An Urban Experience
WSVA7-0090
SOFT TISSUE SURGERY
MANAGEMENT OF AURAL HEMATOMA WITH PENROSE DRAINAGE IN THE DOG AND CAT: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF 53 CASES (1996-2016)
K. Chatzimisios1, V. Papageorgiou1, L. Papazoglou1, I. Savvas1
1School of Veterinary Medicine- Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Companion Animal Clinic, Thessaloniki, Greece
Introduction
An auricular hematoma is de ned blood collection between the cartilage and the skin of the pinna.
Objectives
The records of 53 cases of dogs and cats presented in the Companion Animal Clinic of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki with an aural hematoma treated with Penrose drainage were reviewed.
Methods
Data collected include signalment, concurrent disease, treatment, post surgical complications and long- term outcome.
Results
Common canine breeds represented were 16 mixed breed, 10 GSDs and 3 French Bulldogs. Four cats were DSH and one was a Persian. Mean age of the dogs was 7.6 years and of the cats was 5 years. Three cats and 31 dogs were male, while 2 cats and 17 dogs were female. Otitis externa was diagnosed in 23 dogs and 3 cats and skin disease was diagnosed in 11 dogs and
1 cat. All dogs and cats had a Penrose drain placed within the hematoma cavity. Recurrence of hematoma was reported in 7 dogs and 1 cat. Those animals were treated with revision drainage of the hematoma and placement of a new Penrose tube. Pinna deformation was diagnosed in 14 dogs and 2 cats. No signs of hematoma were reported after a follow up time of 3.5 years for dogs and 4.5 years for cats.
Conclusions
Penrose drain placement is an effective technique for the management of aural hematoma in dogs and cats but recurrence may be seen in 15% of the animals. Recurrence is effectively managed with a new Penrose tube placement.
WSVA7-0246
SOFT TISSUE SURGERY
ECHOLARYNGOGRAPHY AS A TOOL TO ASSESS LARYNGEAL COLLAPSE IN BRACHYCEPHALIC DOGS
A. Cronin1, J. Ladlow1, N.C. Liu1, H. Rudorf1
1Department of Veterinary Medicine, Queen’s Veterinary School Hospital, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
Introduction
Laryngeal collapse is a recognised component of the brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS) and is identi ed by visual inspection during light anaesthesia.
Objectives
To validate the use of echolaryngography in the identi cation of laryngeal collapse in the un-sedated animal.
Methods
33 brachycephalic dogs presented at the QVSH for the investigation of BOAS with echolaryngography and visual inspection of the larynx as a component of the workup.
Echolaryngography was performed with the larger dogs sitting either on the  oor or on a table. The smaller breeds were examined on the lap of the ultrasonographer to minimise stress and panting. A 15 MHz linear probe was placed over the larynx. Care was taken not to apply excessive pressure on the larynx. The vocal folds, rima glottidis and cuneiform processes were identi ed.
According to the visual inspection, the animals were divided into the stages of collapse described in the literature: 0 = no collapse, 1 = everted sacculi, 2 = medial displacement of cuneiform processes, 3 = collapse of corniculate processes. On echolaryngography 2 groups were identi ed N = no collapse and C = collapse.
Results
The breeds examined were 14 Pugs, 14 French Bulldogs, 5 English bulldogs. During echolaryngography the vocal cords, cuneiform processes, and rima glottides were identi ed in the un-sedated animal as described in the literature. Laryngeal sacculi could not be identi ed on echolaryngography thus group N consists of both stages 0 and 1.
780
42ND WORLD SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY ASSOCIATION CONGRESS AND FECAVA 23RD EUROCONGRESS


































































































   778   779   780   781   782